Freedom Tower at Miami Dade College

Freedom Tower at Miami Dade College

 

The restored Freedom Tower at Miami Dade College, formerly known as the Old Main Building, is a unique landmark in the city. Located at 600 Biscayne Blvd, Miami, FL 33132. In addition to the Cuban Assistance Center and the Cuban Diaspora Cultural Legacy Gallery, this landmark features a mural of the city's history. While most Miamians would never know that this historic structure stood here until it was renovated in the 1990s, the mural has become a landmark in Miami's history.  Learn more about this . It is also a popular meeting place for world leaders, with recent guests including King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia of Spain for the Miami Book Fair.

Cuban Assistance Center

The Freedom Tower is a landmark in Miami, Florida. Designed by Schultze and Weaver, it serves as a contemporary art museum and the center for the arts disciplines of Miami Dade College. It can be found at 600 Biscayne Boulevard on the Wolfson Campus of Miami Dade College. Its purpose is unclear, but it's a popular destination for tourists who want to explore the city's history and culture.

Originally built as an office building, the Freedom Tower is an iconic landmark in Miami. It served as the first newspaper in the city, and was later converted into a museum. Exhibits highlight Miami's unique role as a cultural crossroads. A free, open house will be held on October 20th to celebrate the building's history and honor the Cuban diaspora.

Cuban Diaspora Cultural Legacy Gallery

The Cuban Diaspora Cultural Legacy Gallery at MDC celebrates the contributions of people from the Cuban diaspora to South Florida culture. This exhibit focuses on the freedom movement, including the story of El Refugio, a former Cuban exile center in Miami. The Freedom Tower, an iconic building in Miami's downtown core, was donated to the college by the Martin and Canosa families. The tower is an important symbol for the Cuban diaspora, who fled the communist country for freedom.

The exhibition is a permanent display at the Miami Dade College Museum of Art and Design, a museum dedicated to the impact of Cuban culture on South Florida. It currently features the work of local artist Alexis Rodriguez-Duarte, who was born in Cuba and raised in Miami. In addition to the Cuban diaspora, the museum also exhibits Cuban art, architecture, and the history of the island nation.

Museum of Art + Design

The Museum of Art + Design at Miami Dade Community College is a beautiful and spacious space featuring modern art by established and emerging designers. Its rotating exhibitions are an excellent way to discover new and interesting work. Whether you're an art lover or just looking for a unique gift for a loved one, this museum is sure to be something you'll enjoy. It's also located in a convenient location near Miami's downtown business district.

The museum is home to an extensive permanent collection of over 1,900 works of art in every genre and medium. The collection was originally developed at the individual campuses but became an official institution at the North Campus of MDC. Today, the museum celebrates the achievements of emerging and under-recognized artists, as well as major figures of modern art. The museum also features pieces from contemporary Latin American artists and Pop Art.

Restoration of Schultze and Weaver's Freedom Tower

Aeon Preservation Services was contracted to complete a facade assessment for the historic Freedom Tower at Miami Dade College. The tower, which was designed by noted hotel architects Schultze and Weaver in New York, was originally built to house the Miami News. During the mid-twentieth century, it was seized by the United States government and served as South Florida's Ellis Island, serving as a refugee center for Cuban immigrants. Today, the building houses the museum and educational center that will preserve the history of the building.

Since the tower was completed in 1964, it has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was once an abandoned office building but was saved after vandals destroyed it. The tower was renovated in 1987 by a Saudi Arabian consortium but a new owner did not make the necessary improvements before its designation as a National Historic Landmark. The restoration of this tower took nearly 10 years to complete.